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Graphics by Rhio

 The Beginning of Tulsa
By J. M. Hall (1927)

(c) Karolyn Kay Garland (1997)

Nothing here is free for the taking. This book is reproduced here with the permission of the copyright holder - see copyright statement.

 Page 26

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Presbyterian Mission School Teachers (con't)

A proposition was made by the women that they would buy the lumber if the men would build a fence around the school property consisting of about four blocks. The work was done.
       At the beginning of school in 1884 the only musical instrument the school had was a small melodeon. In 1888 a chapel organ was bought and paid for by giving entertainments by the teachers and pupils. In 1889, through the board in New York, a piano was bought and paid for by the superintendent giving piano lessons.
       From her girlhood Miss Jennie Stringfield had been doing church work. In the Mission she entered into all the activities of the church. Taught in the Sunday school, attended prayer meeting, visited the sick and was the church organist for many years.
       In 1889 a meeting was called and all the women that were interested in the school and church were invited. Miss Stringfield presided at the meeting. After the object of the meeting was explained the Hattie Graybill Missionary society was organized. Mrs. Haworth, the pastor's wife, was elected president. Miss Stringfield, vice president; Miss Bettie Stringfield as secretary. Miss Juanita Hall was elected treasurer. From this small beginning in 1889 the Hattie Graybill Missionary society of the First Presbyterian church has grown and at this date, 1932, has a membership of 250 to 300. Miss Stringfield has been an active member of this society from the beginning to the present time and is still an active member.
       There are over 30 fathers and mothers living in Tulsa who went to school to Miss Stringfield. Some of these have grand children. After teaching in the Mission school about four years Miss Stringfield resigned in 1891.
       She later married J. M. Hall, a merchant in Tulsa. Mr. and Mrs. Hall have reared a family of five children. Three girls and two boys. They are: Mrs. Juanita Hall Scott, Mrs. Lena Hall Bradshaw, Mrs. Kathryn Hall Dunn. All living in Tulsa. Harry S. Hall lives in Eureka Springs, Arkansas. Hugh M. Hall was killed in a pullman car accident years ago.
       Mrs. Hall is very happy to know she has the love and sincere friendship of all those who went to school to her more than 40 years ago. Mr. and Mrs. Hall are living at 1801 Admiral and are trying to make their last days in Tulsa their happiest days.

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MISS BETTIE STRINGFIELD

Photo Bettie Stringfield

       Miss Bettie Stringfield came with her sister in the fall of 1887 from Missouri.
       The addition to the school building was finished and on the opening of the school, as had been anticipated, the three teachers had all they could do to take care of the pupils.
       At this time the school needed a teacher like Miss Bettie. She had a fine voice and sang well with her other qualifications as a teacher. She was a good expression teacher.
       It was required by the Mission board that all the teachers should do certain church work and teach in the Sunday school. Fortunately for Miss Bettie Stringfield she had this training before she took up her work in the Mission school in Tulsa. She was very helpful in training the children in the various lines of the school and church activities.
       When Miss Jennie Stringfield resigned in 1891 Miss Chambers took her place in the school, but resigned in 1892 and went as a missionary to Turkey. Miss Battle resigned also in 1892 and a few months later married A. H. Poage, Frisco railroad agent.
       Mr. Poage later went to the Santa Fe railroad and moved to California. Twenty-five (25) years ago he had a

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