Table of Contents

Home
What's New?
Addresses
Bits & Pieces
Cities & Towns
Death Related Info
E-Mail List Tulsa
Family Genealogies
History
Links to other sites
Look-Ups
Maps
Marriages
Newspapers
Photo Gallery
Queries
Resources
Reunions
Schools & Churches
Sister Counties
Weather In Tulsa
USGenWeb OK Site
AHGP OK Site
USGenWeb Tulsa Co Site
USGenWeb Tulsa Archives

AHGP

USGenWeb


Graphics by Rhio

 The Beginning of Tulsa
By J. M. Hall (1927)

(c) Karolyn Kay Garland (1997)

Nothing here is free for the taking. This book is reproduced here with the permission of the copyright holder - see copyright statement.

 Page 45

Dividing Line

The First Commercial Club (con't)

        Tulsa was only a little trading place-several stores and only one railroad.
        When the Missouri, Kansas and Texas railroad officials made a survey across the Frisco about seven miles east of Tulsa and when the Santa Fe engineers surveyed for a crossing at about the same spot it became necessary for the businessmen to take some drastic action to bring these lines into the town. They realized that with two more railroads Tulsa would have a permanent foundation.
        In order to get the townsmen together the Commercial club was organized George S. Mowbray, Sr was elected as its first president in 1902. In 1903 George Williamson was made president, in 1904 the writer held that post and in 1905 L J. Martin was in office.
        The early club members worked together with fine spirit arid were successful in landing the Katy. the Santa Fe, and the Midland Valley.

Dividing Line

REV. GEORGE W. MOWBRAY, SR.

Photo George Mowbray

        Rev. George W. Mowbray, Sr., was the second pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church in Tulsa. He came with his family in 1888. He was the fifth mayor of the city and first president of the Commercial club, and was a great booster for Tulsa to the day of his death. He organized the Mowbray Undertaking Co., which has always retained that name. Following the tragic passing of T. J. Archer, his son-in-law, he was too occupied with pressing business affairs to take any regular church charge.
        By his death Tulsa lost one of its most prominent citizens of all time. Mrs. Mowbray, a lovable, Christian woman, lives with her daughter, Mrs. T. J. Archer. at 808 N Denver avenue. (Deceased)

Dividing Line

FIRST BOOSTER TRIP

        In 1904 the club members thought it would be a good thing to advertise Tulsa by sending the town band to the Louisiana Purchase exposition at St. Louis. There was one difficulty. There were more bandsmen than instruments. A stirring meeting was held and $1000 raised for the horns. The club members paid the railroad fares to and from the exposition and the players' expenses while there. The band gave concerts two afternoons in front of the Indian Territory building on the exposition grounds.
        Clarence Eaton, now manager of the band that bears his name, was then one of the band boys. Mrs. Eaton made the trip, too, as did Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Lynch. the writer and Mrs. Hall and numerous others. This was Tulsa's first booster trip and considered a splendid achievement in that day.

Dividing Line

W. S. DICKASON

Photo W S Dickason

FIRST LUMBER YARD

        The first exclusive lumber yard was opened by W. S. Dickason and T. E.

Dividing Line

Previous         Next

Return to Table of Content

Return to Tulsa Home Page

 

Contact: Linda Haas Davenport