Table of Contents

Home
What's New?
Addresses
Bits & Pieces
Cities & Towns
Death Related Info
E-Mail List Tulsa
Family Genealogies
History
Links to other sites
Look-Ups
Maps
Marriages
Newspapers
Photo Gallery
Queries
Resources
Reunions
Schools & Churches
Sister Counties
Weather In Tulsa
USGenWeb OK Site
AHGP OK Site
USGenWeb Tulsa Co Site
USGenWeb Tulsa Archives

AHGP

USGenWeb


Graphics by Rhio

 The Beginning of Tulsa
By J. M. Hall (1927)

(c) Karolyn Kay Garland (1997)

Nothing here is free for the taking. This book is reproduced here with the permission of the copyright holder - see copyright statement.

 Page 57

Dividing Line

R. L. LUNSFORD

Photo R L Lunsford

        R. L. Lunsford lived in Tulsa before going to Cleveland and was publisher and owner of the Tulsa Democrat.
       Mr. Lunsford is president of the First National bank in Cleveland. Has been in the banking business many years. He has other banking interests in the state. And has been successful in the oil business and royalties, also in farm and city property.
       By calling on Mr. Lunsford you will always find him sober and ready for business.
       He and his good wife are members of the First Presbyterian church in Tulsa. I am sure it will please Dr. Kerr very much if he would remember the church endowment fund in his will. They have one son and one daughter, both married.
       Mr. Lunsford, when living in Tulsa, was a great booster for our little city. He is a jolly good fellow. We are always glad to have him and his good wife visit his old home town to meet their friends.

THE OPENING OF OKLAHOMA

       In 1889 when Oklahoma was opened for settlement, Tulsa was one of the gate ways for thousands of would-be settlers who came by wagon, buggy and horse back from many states.
       Knowing little about the Arkansas river men driving teams thought that when the sand began to slip under the wheels the wagon was going to sink in the quick sand They thought that by rushing their horses across the river they would save themselves. Many of the horses were soon exhausted and went down in the water.
       Women and children crawled out of the wagons and into the water crying. These were rescued, of course. When men were posted to tell the travelers to drive slowly they had little trouble getting across.

This procession continued for many days. Then there came a big rise in the river The ferry boat was too slow. Some of the men took their wagons apart and carried them across the railroad bridge, later swimming their horses across and rebuilding on the Red Fork side. The railroad company finally posted guards to prevent this.
       Some of the would-be settlers who were not successful in finding what they wanted in the new territory returned to Tulsa. Some of them took leases or rented farms from the Indians and have lived here since.

BROTHERS INTO BUSINESS

LEE CLINTON

Photo Lee Clinton

       Lee Clinton, a younger brother, was also born on the ranch and brought up in Red Fork. After completing his education

Dividing Line

Previous         Next

Return to Table of Content

Return to Tulsa Home Page

 

Contact: Linda Haas Davenport