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 The Beginning of Tulsa
By J. M. Hall (1927)

(c) Karolyn Kay Garland (1997)

Nothing here is free for the taking. This book is reproduced here with the permission of the copyright holder - see copyright statement.

 Page 79

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Brief Histories of the Earliest Tulsans (con't)

        H. I. Kelly was of the brick manufacturing Kelly family and he came to Tulsa in 1897, engaging later in the construction business. He has changed his vocation since then and with his wife and four daughters lives at 923 S. Detroit avenue.

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        J. H. Kelly arrived in Tulsa with other members of the family in 1897 and engaged in the brick-making and building business. He has also been in other lines and now lives at 302 E. Tenth street with his wife and daughter.

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        Marion Kelly became a citizen of Tulsa in 1897 and engaged in the manufacture of brick, as well as in the contracting business. He put up a number of the first brick buildings in the town. Though not in the best of health in late years he has been able to look after his property interests. He and Mrs. Kelly live at 916 S. Boston avenue.

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        Chief Keokuk was a Sac-and-Fox Indian. This tribe's agency was 65 miles west of Tulsa. The chief brought 30 young girls and some of their fathers and mothers to Tulsa where the youngsters took the train for the Carlisle Indian school. There was no place in Tulsa for this large party to sleep while waiting for the train so the writer invited them all into his store to make their beds on the floor behind the counters. The chief was very grateful. When the time came to go to the train the older Indians were crying. Chief Keokuk turned to the writer and said, "Me cry when we get to the train." Indians have great love for their children.

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        C. W. Kern became a resident of Tulsa in 1894 and has been in the contracting and building business since that time. He has taken high interest in the development of Tulsa and has done his part in putting the city ahead. He lives, with his family, at 213 E. Fairview avenue.

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        George Kilkairn was an old-timer and a butcher in Bud Wallace's meat market. He will be remembered by many pioneers.

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        Tom Kinney was a cowboy living with and working for George Perryman in the early days. He is old now and in ill health and must be cared for. (Deceased.)

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        Dr. S. S. Kimmons is a native of Mississippi but came to Tulsa in 1897 and has been practicing medicine here since that time. In point of residence and practice he has been in Tulsa longer than any other physician, except Dr. Fred S. Clinton. He is said to have "found" more babies who have grown to be citizens of Tulsa than any other doctor. He is a member of the various medical societies and has been successful in his practice. He came unmarried, and went to Galveston, Texas, for Mrs. Kimmon some years later. They live happily at 725 S. Cincinnati avenue. (Deceased.)

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        Henry Kneisel came to Tulsa about 1894 and at one time owned valuable property on First and Archer streets. Later he built a brick home on the corner of East Admiral boulevard and South Victor avenue. He was in the oil leasing and drilling business principally. He died some years ago and Mrs. Kneisel moved away shortly afterward.

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        L. D. Lewis came to Tulsa in 1897 and, with George R. Brobeck, was in the hardware business for some years. Their place of business was on Main street, between First and Second streets. Mr. Lewis still lives here, at 1611 W. Cameron St. He and Mrs. Lewis have reared three sons, Floyd, Corder and Pat, and one daughter, Mossie, all of whom are married.

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        Lut L. Lewis will be remembered by many of the old timers. He came from Colorado and opened a small farm on South Peoria avenue, long before it was Peoria or an avenue. After clearing off the trees and underbrush he planted several acres of Rockyford cantaloupes, the first crop grown near Tulsa. He died several years ago but Mrs. Lewis is still living at 218 W. Ninth street.

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        Frank Mathewson was an inter-married citizen of the Creek Nation. When Tulsa was located he was living on a farm south of the village. Later he engaged in the livery business in Tulsa and served as a member of one of the early city councils. He died in Tulsa after a lingering illness, leaving his widow and several grown children.

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        Doctor Mains came to Tulsa at an early date and practiced medicine for a number of years. Later he made a number of profitable investments here. He still lives near Tulsa.

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