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The Beginning of Tulsa
By J. M. Hall (1927)

(c) Karolyn Kay Garland (1997)

Nothing here is free for the taking. This book is reproduced here with the permission of the copyright holder - see copyright statement.

 Page 81

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Brief Histories of the Earliest Tulsans (con't)

        L. M. Mitchell came to Tulsa in 1890 and has been engaged in the painting and decorating business since that time. L. M. intends to spend the rest of his days here, he tells his friends.

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        Joe Moore was a Civil war veteran who lived and worked in Tulsa and will be remembered by the old-timers. He would take any bet. One cold day a man bet him a dollar he wouldn't pull off his shirt and run to the Frisco tracks from First street. Joe won that dollar. He loved his dram.

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        Col. W. P. Moore, was an old soldier who lived in Tulsa at an early date. He had a restaurant on the west side of Main street between First and Second streets. Later he was appointed postmaster and served several years. (Deceased.)

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        Jake Moran became a citizen of Tulsa in 1895. He was a stone mason contractor and became known as one of Tulsa's good citizens, serving one term as city commissioner. At one time he moved to Salina, Okla., but he was not long in returning to Tulsa. He was the brother of John Moran, Sr. (Deceased.)

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        John Moran, Sr., came to Tulsa in 1897 and owned a number of freighting teams. He and Mrs. Moran had a fine family of children who grew from boyhood and girlhood in Tulsa. John, Reese and Roy, the three sons, still live here. Reese has been chief of police for some years. The only daughter Mrs. Frank G. Seaman, also lives in Tulsa. (Deceased.)

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        George Mowbray, Jr., came to Tulsa from Kansas in 1888 and for a number of years was a clerk in the Archer hardware and furniture store. When Mr. Archer was killed he assisted in winding up the store's affairs and later engaged in several lines of business. At the present he is in the city water department. Mr. and Mrs. Mowbray live at 1915 W. Archer street. They have two daughters, one married and one at home.

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        A. D. Orcutt, crossed the Arkansas river in 1875 near Tulsa, and rented a farm from the Perryman's south of town, and lived there several years. Then he moved to Tulsa and engaged in the implement business. Later he moved to Wagoner county and represented that county in the first legislature. The old timers will remember Mr. Orcutt for his friendly greeting. His two sons, S. A. and Garfield, will also be remembered. The Orcutt addition gets its name from S. A. Orcutt, who now lives with his family on his large ranch in New Mexico. A. W. Orcutt died many years ago, leaving a wife and several children who now live in Tulsa.

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        H. C. Payne has lived in or near Tulsa since an early date. While living on his farm on Flat Rock creek, north of Tulsa, oil was found there in paying quantities. He moved to the city where he has a number of valuable pieces of property. He and Mrs. Payne live at 1110 N. Denver avenue.

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        George Pittman came to Tulsa about 1897 with his family and was in the jewelry business until his death many years ago.

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        Luna Price came to Tulsa from Texas at a very early date with some cattlemen and later engaged in the harness and saddlery business for a number of years. He and Mrs. Price died many years ago, leaving a daughter and considerable property interests.

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        Joe Price came to Tulsa about 1896 and soon moved his family to the new town. He was in the cattle business up to the time of his death. He will always be remembered as one of four men who bought the school property at Fourth Street and Boston avenue and held it until the city could acquire it, thus keeping it out of speculative private hands. Dr. Harry Price, Henry Price and Charles Price are three married sons of this family who have always made Tulsa their home.

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        P. L. Price made his first trip to Tulsa in 1894. He returned to Missouri then but came back in 1895 to make the new town his permanent home. He associated himself in the grocery business with J. M. Gillette in 1896. Some time afterward they erected a stone store on the east side of Main street, between First and Second streets. When the Egan store and the

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