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Graphics by Rhio

 The Beginning of Tulsa
By J. M. Hall (1927)

(c) Karolyn Kay Garland (1997)

Nothing here is free for the taking. This book is reproduced here with the permission of the copyright holder - see copyright statement.

Page 87

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Brief Histories of the Earliest Tulsans (con't)

        R. B. Stansbery was a farmer near Neosho, Mo., until 1889 when Oklahoma was opened for settlement and when he, his wife and their four daughters and one son secured a claim near Chandler. They did not keep this long, moving to Tulsa instead. They rented a farm in the section now known as Maple Ridge and farmed there six years. Mr. Stansbery then returned to Missouri to farm for three years and then returned to Tulsa to engage in the cattle trade until his death in 1910. He was successful in business and held in high regard by the old timers. Mrs. Stansbery and two of the daughters have died. One of the remaining daughters lives in Tulsa and the other in Muskogee. The son is Lon Stansbery, who is president of the Pioneer association and sometimes comic writer for The Tulsa Tribune.

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        John Thomas has followed many lines of business since coming to Tulsa at an early date. One of his characteristics marks him as a man who will always be remembered by the pioneer women as well as the men. No matter when or where he met you he would always shake hands. (Deceased.)

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        W. T. Trotter is one of early Tulsa's conspicuous successes. He came at an early date. Though unable to hear or speak he took an active part in the town's business development and has amassed considerable property. He and Mrs. Trotter have two daughters one of whom is married.

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        Joe Truitman was one of Tulsa's very early citizens. He was an old German and his principal business was making walnut coffins. He also made some furniture. He lived by himself in his shop between First and Second streets, doing his own cooking, for his first few years in Tulsa. Later he lived north and east of the Frisco depot. There he had some trouble with a negro woman over a clothes line and he shot and killed her, it was charged. The author knew Joe well and doesn't yet understand how he could have killed the woman by shooting at her - he was so cross-eyed. He died in the Fort Smith jail while waiting to be tried.

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        J. B. Vann arrived in Tulsa from Missouri in 1889 and immediately engaged in the contracting business. He and Mrs. Vann are now living at 32 S. Gillette avenue. Their daughter, Chloe, who attended the old mission school, is married.

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        Pete Vinest came to Tulsa about 1884, taking charge of the men who put large farms into cultivation south of the town along the river. Since then he has engaged in many kinds of work and is now with the city water department. He married after coming to Tulsa and has severa1 children.

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        Bud Wallace was in the grocery and meat business in Tulsa with H. C. Calhoun from an early date until his death many years ago. He was never married. Old-timers remember him for his pleasant disposition.

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        W. W. Winterringer was the father of C. O. Winterringer. He had a contract for part of the grading of the Frisco railroad in 1882 and when he had filled it he left, returning in 1889. Then he engaged in several lines of business, finally becoming a partner in the firm of Winterringer & Holland. He made profitable investments in real estate. Some years later he bought a fruit farm in Missouri, where he died in 1927.

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        Frank Winters has resided in Tulsa since 1893. With Mrs. Winters and their two sons he lives on Federal drive. Mr. Winters was in the milling business for a few years, deserting it to enter the oil business as a drilling contractor. He is another pioneer who is known as one of Tulsa's good citizens. (Deceased.)

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        Jake Wormingion came to Tulsa from Missouri in 1898 and has been in the barber business since that time. He is the oldest barber, in point of residence, in the city today. His first shop was on the east side of Main street, between First and Second streets. Then he moved into the frame building that stood at the corner of Second and Main streets in the back end of the Scott building. When the brick building was built on this lot he moved into it. Among his patrons now are many who have visited his shop regularly since 1898.

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        J. H. Wheatley has made his home in Tulsa since 1898 and served as a city commissioner at one time. At an early date be was in the brick making and contracting business. He has always been interested in the development of Tulsa. He lives with his family, at 201 N. Elwood avenue.  

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